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Cloudflare mitigates biggest DDoS Attack EVER

Cloudflare mitigates biggest DDoS Attack EVER
Syndicated by: Iain Fraser - Cybersecurity Journalist

Cloudflare mitigates record-breaking 71 million request-per-second DDoS attack

This was a weekend of record-breaking DDoS attacks. Over the weekend, Cloudflare detected and mitigated dozens of hyper-volumetric DDoS attacks. The majority of attacks peaked in the ballpark of 50-70 million requests per second (rps) with the largest exceeding 71 million rps. This is the largest reported HTTP DDoS attack on record, more than 35% higher than the previous reported record of 46M rps in June 2022.

The attacks were HTTP/2-based and targeted websites protected by Cloudflare. They originated from over 30,000 IP addresses. Some of the attacked websites included a popular gaming provider, cryptocurrency companies, hosting providers, and cloud computing platforms. The attacks originated from numerous cloud providers, and we have been working with them to crack down on the botnet. Learn More /...

What are DDoS attacks?

Distributed Denial of Service  attacks are cyber attacks that aim to take down Internet properties and make them unavailable for users. These types of cyber-attacks can be very efficient against unprotected websites and they can be very inexpensive for the attackers to execute.

An HTTP DDoS attack usually involves a flood of HTTP requests towards the target website. The attacker’s objective is to bombard the website with more requests than it can handle. Given a sufficiently high amount of requests, the website’s server will not be able to process all of the attack requests along with the legitimate user requests. Users will experience this as website-load delays, timeouts, and eventually not being able to connect to their desired websites at all. Learn More /...


Biggest DDoS Attack Ever


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